Benjamin Disraeli

Benjamin Disraeli
Benjamin Disraeli (1804–1881) was a British politician and writer who twice served as prime minister. He played a central role in the creation of the modern Conservative Party, defining its policies and its broad outreach. Disraeli entered the House of Commons in 1837. In 1846, after clashing with the Prime Minister, Sir Robert Peel, Disraeli became a major figure in the party, though many in it did not favour him. He served as Chancellor of the Exchequer and Leader of the House of Commons in the 1850s and 1860s, and became prime minister briefly in 1868 before losing that year's election. In his second term as prime minister (1874–80), he arranged Britain's purchase of a major interest in the Suez Canal Company, and worked at the Congress of Berlin to maintain peace in the Balkans and to make terms that favoured Britain and weakened Russia. He had throughout his career written novels, and he published his last completed one, Endymion, shortly before he died. Disraeli is remembered for his influential voice in world affairs, his political battles with the Liberal leader William Ewart Gladstone, and his one-nation conservatism or "Tory democracy".

Carolyn James

Some say he’s half man half fish, others say he’s more of a seventy/thirty split. Either way he’s a fishy bastard. Google

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